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Introduction to Logic, 2nd Edition by Eric Kao, Michael Genesereth

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CHAPTER 10

Equality

10.1 INTRODUCTION

In our discussion of Relational Logic thus far, we have assumed that there is a one-to-one relationship between ground terms in our language and objects in the application area we are trying to describe. For example, in talking about people, we have been assuming a unique name for each person. In arithmetic, we have been assuming a unique term for each number. This makes things conceptually simple, and it is a reasonable way to go in many circumstances.

But not always. In natural language, we often find it convenient to use more than one term to refer to the same real world object. For example, we sometimes have multiple names for the same person – Michael, Mike, and so forth. And, in Arithmetic, we frequently ...

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