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iPod: The Missing Manual, 7th Edition by David Pogue, J.D. Biersdorfer

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Mapping Your Way with Wi-Fi

People who bought the first version of the iPod Touch had to use Safari for all their map work and driving directions. Owners of 2008 iPod Touches (and those who paid Apple $10 or $20 to upgrade their software on their 2007 models) can use the built-in Maps app instead. Like Safari, though, Maps needs a Wi-Fi connection to pull its data down from the Web, so it's not the best thing in the world for emergency directions when you're lost in the bad part of town.

To plot your course, tap the Maps icon on the Home screen. Here are some of the things you can do with Maps and a network connection:

  • Find yourself. Tap the icon in the bottom-left corner (circled) to have the Touch pinpoint your current location within a few hundred yards. (While it doesn't have a GPS chip inside, it does have software that calculates your position based on a big database of Wi-Fi hotspots.)

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  • Find an address. In the Address box at the top of the screen, type in an address—or tap the icon to call up your Contacts list, where you can select the friend or business you want to map. Tap the Search button to see a red pushpin drop on that location.

  • Find your way. Tap the Directions button at the bottom of the screen. A two-field box appears. If you don't want to use your current location, tap ...

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