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IT Systems in Public Transport

Book Description

This book is intended for those who develop, implement and operate public transport IT systems. These readers need to be familiar with the software and understand public transport IT systems both at a high level and in detail. This is achieved through descriptions of public transport business processes and a detailed illustration of a comprehensive systems data model. Furthermore, the book was written for professors and students of transport and IT, at universities and other institutes of higher education. 

Table of Contents

  1. Cover Page
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright Page
  4. Table of Contents
  5. Chapter 1: Introduction
    1. 1.1 IT systems in PT are complicated!
    2. 1.2 Standardisation
    3. 1.3 Challenges for system providers
    4. 1.4 The significance of a domain model
    5. 1.5 What awaits you in this book ...
    6. 1.6 What you will not find ...
  6. Part I: Overview
    1. Chapter 2: IT System Landscape of a Transport Company
      1. 2.1 Systems and business processes at a glance
      2. 2.2 Actors and roles
      3. 2.3 Special requirements for systems in PT
        1. 2.3.1 Multitenancy
        2. 2.3.2 Versions and variants
        3. 2.3.3 Special notation for rules
        4. 2.3.4 Cross-process optimisation
    2. Chapter 3: The ITTC Core Model
      1. 3.1 Tips on notation
      2. 3.2 Defining the contents
      3. 3.3 The structure of the ITTC class model
      4. 3.4 The most important relations in the core model
        1. 3.4.1 The network: locations and links
        2. 3.4.2 Travel paths and routes
        3. 3.4.3 Calendar and time of day
        4. 3.4.4 Transport services: trip and connection
        5. 3.4.5 Vehicles and vehicle workings
        6. 3.4.6 Driver and duty
        7. 3.4.7 The link between trips and duties
      5. 3.5 Outlook
  7. Part II: Business Processes and IT Systems
    1. Chapter 4: Vehicles, Vehicle Types and Vehicle Formations
      1. 4.1 Identifying objects – using the example of vehicles
      2. 4.2 How vehicles are equipped: Groups of attributes
      3. 4.3 Configurable attributes
      4. 4.4 Extract from the class model
      5. 4.5 Creating formations
      6. 4.6 Vehicle types
      7. 4.7 Maintenance
      8. 4.8 Vehicle equipment
      9. 4.9 Communication architecture in the vehicle
      10. 4.10 The software architecture of an on-board computer
      11. 4.11 Hardware for the on-board computer
    2. Chapter 5: The Traffic Network and Routes
      1. 5.1 Modelling the network in IT systems
      2. 5.2 Representation of the network in the user dialog
    3. Chapter 6: Planning/Scheduling
      1. 6.1 Taking irregularities into account (aspects)
      2. 6.2 IT architecture of planning systems
      3. 6.3 Timetable planning
        1. 6.3.1 Trips
        2. 6.3.2 The timetable planner’s working process
        3. 6.3.3 Connections
        4. 6.3.4 Timetable display and information
      4. 6.4 Vehicle working scheduling
        1. 6.4.1 Vehicle workings in the ITTC class model
        2. 6.4.2 Building vehicle workings from trips
        3. 6.4.3 Planning deadhead trips
        4. 6.4.4 Linking vehicle workings
      5. 6.5 Optimisation of trips and vehicle workings
      6. 6.6 Duty scheduling
        1. 6.6.1 Overview
        2. 6.6.2 Duties in the ITTC class model
        3. 6.6.3 The duty scheduler’s working process
        4. 6.6.4 Duty sequences
        5. 6.6.5 Optimising duties and duty sequences
      7. 6.7 Integrated vehicle working and duty scheduling
    4. Chapter 7: Dispatch
      1. 7.1 Personnel dispatch
        1. 7.1.1 Work processes
        2. 7.1.2 Personnel dispatch in the ITTC class model
        3. 7.1.3 IT systems for personnel dispatch
        4. 7.1.4 Automatic dispatch and optimisation
      2. 7.2 Vehicle dispatch
        1. 7.2.1 Work processes
        2. 7.2.2 Vehicle dispatch in the ITTC class model
        3. 7.2.3 IT systems for vehicle dispatch
    5. Chapter 8: Transport Control
      1. 8.1 Base data in the control system
      2. 8.2 Geolocating
      3. 8.3 Fleet control through control circuits
      4. 8.4 The model: events and actions
      5. 8.5 Operating an operation control system
      6. 8.6 System monitoring
      7. 8.7 Communication system
    6. Chapter 9: Dynamic Passenger Information
      1. 9.1 Dynamic information
      2. 9.2 Situations and types of passenger information
      3. 9.3 ITTC sub-model: DPI
      4. 9.4 Scope
      5. 9.5 Preparing and displaying information
      6. 9.6 Forecast
      7. 9.7 DPI installations/stop computer
      8. 9.8 Transferring data between the control centre and DPI displays
      9. 9.9 Automated processing of actions
      10. 9.10 Deleting the display when the vehicle departs
      11. 9.11 Operating a DPI system
      12. 9.12 Joint DPI for multiple transport companies
    7. Chapter 10: Sales and Distribution
      1. 10.1 Ticketing class model: Overview
      2. 10.2 Ticketing role model
      3. 10.3 Access control
      4. 10.4 Products and fares
      5. 10.5 Sales
      6. 10.6 Payment flows and background systems
      7. 10.7 Paper tickets
        1. 10.7.1 Carrier material and security precautions
        2. 10.7.2 Usage
      8. 10.8 Online tickets
        1. 10.8.1 Carrier material
        2. 10.8.2 Security precautions
        3. 10.8.3 Example: HandyTicket from the VDV
      9. 10.9 eTickets
        1. 10.9.1 Carrier material
        2. 10.9.2 Security precautions
        3. 10.9.3 Digression: the basics of security in eTicketing
        4. 10.9.4 Usage
        5. 10.9.5 The VDV core application
        6. 10.9.6 Example: Touch&Travel
      10. 10.10 Hardware for ticketing
    8. Chapter 11: Settlement, Performance Analysis and Quality Management
      1. 11.1 Transport contracts
      2. 11.2 The class model as the basis of all reports
      3. 11.3 Typical evaluations
        1. 11.3.1 Analysing passenger demand
        2. 11.3.2 Evaluating the transport service
        3. 11.3.3 Evaluating the quality of service
        4. 11.3.4 Evaluating ticket revenue
      4. 11.4 Platforms for evaluations
        1. 11.4.1 A conceptual model of a data warehouse
        2. 11.4.2 Technology for data warehouses
        3. 11.4.3 How it is displayed
  8. Part III: Background Knowledge
    1. Chapter 12: Passenger Transport
      1. 12.1 Why does public transport exist?
      2. 12.2 Public transport and the market economy
      3. 12.3 Profitability
      4. 12.4 Public transport organisation
      5. 12.5 Subsidies and competition
      6. 12.6 Public transport vs. private transport
      7. 12.7 Success factors for public transport
      8. 12.8 Safety
      9. 12.9 A look at the world
    2. Chapter 13: Informatics
      1. 13.1 Description methods – a look back
      2. 13.2 Designing IT architecture
      3. 13.3 Tools for modelling
    3. Chapter 14: Modelling Methods
      1. 14.1 Creating sub-models
      2. 14.2 Displaying classes
      3. 14.3 General naming rules
      4. 14.4 Packages, classes, attributes, functions
      5. 14.5 Temporal patterns and events
      6. 14.6 Functionally unique key terms
      7. 14.7 Class instance attributes
      8. 14.8 Consistency conditions
      9. 14.9 Navigating along relations
      10. 14.10 Conditions for relations: Invariants
      11. 14.11 Recursive relations
      12. 14.12 Ambiguous relations
      13. 14.13 Aggregations
      14. 14.14 Inheritance and typing
      15. 14.15 Corresponding class hierarchies
      16. 14.16 Composite pattern
      17. 14.17 Interfaces
  9. Appendix
    1. Appendix A: System Landscape
      1. A.1 Business processes and systems at a glance
      2. A.2 Systems and data flows in detail
        1. A.2.1 Planning
        2. A.2.2 Dispatch
        3. A.2.3 Transport control
        4. A.2.4 Dynamic passenger information
        5. A.2.5 Ticketing
        6. A.2.6 Evaluation, quality management
    2. Appendix B: Packages and Classes
      1. B.1 Connections
      2. B.2 Aspects
      3. B.3 BasicTypes
      4. B.4 Company
      5. B.5 DutyExecution
      6. B.6 DutyScheduling
      7. B.7 PassengerInformation
      8. B.8 TimetablePlanning
      9. B.9 TripExecution
      10. B.10 Vehicles
      11. B.11 VehiclePeripheralEquipment
      12. B.12 Calendar
      13. B.13 Communication
      14. B.14 ConfigurableAttributes
      15. B.15 Customer
      16. B.16 CustomerSpecificTypes
      17. B.17 Routes
      18. B.18 Network
      19. B.19 Location
      20. B.20 Personnel
      21. B.21 DisruptionManagement
      22. B.22 Fare
      23. B.23 Ticket
      24. B.24 VehicleWorkingScheduling
      25. B.25 Validation
      26. B.26 Sales
      27. B.27 TransportPlanning
      28. B.28 Payment
    3. Appendix C: Glossary
    4. Appendix D: Literature
      1. D.1 Public transport in general
      2. D.2 Vehicles
      3. D.3 Transport service, demand analysis
      4. D.4 Timetable planning
      5. D.5 Connection planning
      6. D.6 Timetable information
      7. D.7 Vehicle working scheduling
      8. D.8 Duty scheduling
      9. D.9 Integrated planning
      10. D.10 Dispatch
      11. D.11 Control
      12. D.12 Dynamic passenger information
      13. D.13 Fares, ticketing
      14. D.14 Quality management, accounting
      15. D.15 Transport policy, transport companies, associations
      16. D.16 Software modelling
    5. Index
  10. Footnotes
    1. Chapter 1: Introduction
    2. Chapter 2: IT System Landscape of a Transport Company
    3. Chapter 3: The ITTC Core Model
    4. Chapter 4: Vehicles, Vehicle Types and Vehicle Formations
    5. Chapter 5: The Traffic Network and Routes
    6. Chapter 6: Planning/Scheduling
    7. Chapter 7: Dispatch
    8. Chapter 8: Transport Control
    9. Chapter 9: Dynamic Passenger Information
    10. Chapter 10: Sales and Distribution
    11. Chapter 11: Settlement, Performance Analysis and Quality Management
    12. Chapter 12: Passenger Transport
    13. Chapter 13: Informatics
    14. Chapter 14: Modelling Methods
    15. Appendix A: System Landscape