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Java SOA Cookbook by Eben Hewitt

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JBI

Java Business Integration 1.0 (JBI) is a specification published by the Sun JSR process as JSR 208. It was released in August 2005, and it defines a standards-based architecture for integration built on the idea of a meta-container. As Java developers and architects, we’re used to talking about servlet containers (which serve as an execution environment for servlets and JSPs) and EJB containers (which serve as an execution environment for Enterprise JavaBeans). Developers write an EJB, and they execute inside an EJB container. But JBI defines a meta-container, or a container of containers. This meta-container does not execute anything itself. It serves as a life cycle management point for a collection of engines that are each capable of executing a specific kind of integration technology. That means that as long as you conform to the interface required by JBI, you can write an engine that executes some arbitrary specific code, instead of the specification dictating to you what you will be allowed to execute (as is the case with EJB).

The idea is this: someone implements the JBI spec and then they (or other vendors) can in turn implement engines that are pluggable within that container. Just as a servlet written to run in Tomcat can port to WebSphere and run there with little or no modification, so too can JBI service engines port from one JBI implementation to another. Each engine plugged into the JBI environment is capable of executing one specific integration technology, such ...

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