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Learning Red Hat Linux by Bill McCarty

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Chapter 10. Setting Up a Linux-Based LAN

This chapter explains how to set up a local-area network (LAN) that includes a Linux Samba server, which lets Microsoft Windows and UNIX systems access shared files and printers hosted by your Linux system. The chapter also explains how to use linuxconf to administer a simple LAN and describes how to install, configure, and administer Samba servers and clients. Integrating your Linux system with an existing LAN is no more complicated than setting up your own LAN; the chapter also explains how to connect to an existing network. The chapter also explains how to use Linux backup and recovery utilities so that client systems can create and use backups stored on the server.

Introduction

One of the great strengths of Linux is its powerful and robust networking capabilities. The good news is that everything about Linux’s networking setup is open to inspection and completely configurable. Nothing is hidden from the user, and no parameters are forced on you. The challenge is to get the most out of this setup for your needs.

Basic networking principles don’t differ much between Windows and Linux, and indeed the principles aren’t unfamiliar. This chapter starts with an overview of networking, and then looks in more detail at Linux networking on a Local Area Network (LAN). In the next two chapters, you’ll learn about making a dialup Internet connection, and setting up Wide Area Network (WAN) services.

Most computers today handle network traffic much ...

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