O'Reilly logo

Linux: Embedded Development by Chris Simmonds, Alex González, Alexandru Vaduva

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Summary

Every Linux device needs an init program of some kind. If you are designing a system which only has to launch a small number of daemons at startup and remains fairly static after that, then BusyBox init is sufficient for your needs. It is usually a good choice if you are using Buildroot as the build system.

If, on the other hand, you have a system that has complex dependencies between services at boot time or runtime, and you have the storage space, then systemd would be the best choice. Even without the complexity, systemd has some useful features in the way it handles watchdogs, remote logging, and so on, so you should certainly give it a serious thought.

It is hard to make a case for System V init on its own merits, since it has few advantages ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required