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Linux® For Dummies®, 8th Edition by Richard Blum, Dee-Ann LeBlanc

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Step 4: Set Advanced Folder Permissions

There is one additional trick that you must use to complete the shared folder permissions. When Fedora Linux creates a user account, it assigns each user to a unique group (which happens to be the same as the username). Unfortunately, this causes problems in a shared folder environment.

Even though your users are all members of the same group, their primary Linux group is still their unique group name. When a user creates a new file in the shared folder, it belongs to the user’s primary group, not your newly created group.

To solve this problem, you must tell the shared folder to use the folder’s group, not the user’s group, when users create new files. This requires a special Linux permission that is not available from the Nautilus Properties window.

You must manually assign this permission from the command line prompt by using the Linux chmod command. Here are the steps to accomplish this:

1.
Select ApplicationsSystem ToolsTerminal to start the command line session.
2.
If you are not logged in as the root user, from the command line, type su to become the root user. Enter the root user password when prompted.
3.
Type the command chmod g+rws/accounting. The chmod Linux command changes the permissions on the specified folder. The individual ...

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