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Linux in a Windows World by Roderick W Smith

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Summary

Linux can be deployed in many different ways on a Windows network. One common approach is to install Linux as a server OS, supplementing or replacing Windows servers. This type of installation is often fairly well-defined in terms of its role and can be done with a modest amount of planning. You need to know the system’s intended role and what server programs are available to help the system fill that role. Another type of deployment, and a much more ambitious one, is to put Linux on the desktop. This approach typically involves replacing many Windows systems with Linux and requires careful attention to detail, both in terms of Linux’s technical features and in terms of users’ interactions with Linux. Finally, instead of performing a workstation rollout, you can use a thin client configuration, in which Linux serves as a thin client OS or as a central login server for thin clients. This approach can save money and reduce administrative headaches, but it has drawbacks, including network bandwidth requirements and increased vulnerability to a single system’s failure.

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