O'Reilly logo

Living in Information by Jorge Arango

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Conclusion

If you ask people what they think about when they think about design, many will tell you about things they either like or dislike about a particular product. You’ll hear about their iPhone, their car, a building, a chair, a book, a poster. It’s always about a thing—a form that exists in the world. This shouldn’t surprise us. We can relate to forms. We see them, touch them, hold them, get into and out of them. They’re “real”; we tacitly understand where we stand in relation to them.

But forms are not the only product of design. Things don’t exist in a vacuum; they always address—and alter—a broader context. The coffee mug next to your computer is a response to a context that includes your biological need to ingest liquids, the mechanics ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required