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LogoLounge 2 by Catharine Fishel, Bill Gardener

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101
A new hybrid of logo or wordmark has
emerged in the past few years:
designs that are essentially URLs. The
mark for Luxi, a new online retailer for
high-end jewelry and watches, fits this
description. The New York City office
of Liska & Associates created its
wordmark and also named the new
service in 2003.
The new name needed to convey
that quality merchandise was avail-
able at discount prices—but the
look and sound of the name had to
be decidedly highbrow. The name
needed to be gender-neutral—strong
enough to appeal to men (who still make up the majority of the
online buying audience) yet friendly enough to welcome the
female shopper.
From a long list of names, Luxi was selected because it was short,
memorable, and easy to spell—crucial for a URL.
“The
I at the end also suggests a nickname,” explains Liska
designer Tanya Quick. “It’s like you are hearing an insider’s secret.”
When the name was selected, the design team began exploring
how to visualize it. One direction involved using images of con-
stellations, because watching the stars was an ancient way of
mapping time. Stars in the sky could also represent diamonds.
Another exploration used the universal symbol for a hand. This
concept worked well for what would eventually become two sis-
ter Luxi sites—one for jewelry and one for watches—because the
hand could be shown wearing either a ring for one URL and a
timepiece on the other, for example.
“This direction was more playful and
could be played out throughout the
site—as a directional, as a helping
hand, and so on,” Quick says. The
client liked this approach but wanted
something that was a bit stronger,
much bolder, and a bit less casual.
“Balancing friendliness and masculin-
ity was important,” she adds.
So the designers developed the idea of
a simple and direct wordmark. The final
design uses an elegant, elongated set
of letters with plenty of presence. But
balancing the letters, especially the
slight
I at the end of the word, was
tricky. Stretching the word turned it into more of a unified shape that
included the
I as part of its form.
The wordmark also worked well for Luxi’s primary applications—
displayed online and stamped on gift boxes. “Going with the sim-
ple mark allows for much more play in packaging and online,”
Quick says. Refining elements such as colors and thick-thin
weights in typography is more difficult in online display than it is
in print, she adds.
But the electronic environment also offers advantages. For
instance, for another Liska project, a line of teen skin-care prod-
ucts that would be sold only online, Liska designers discovered
that they were not bound by a strict requirement of in-store pack-
aging: a powerful shelf face.
“We could think about all sides of the bottle, not just its face. For
this particular design, we let the logo wrap all the way around the
bottle and circle it,” Quick explains. Logos can also be animated,
taken apart, and repurposed in new ways on websites.
“It definitely gives us the ability to have more play,” she adds.
Luxi
Identity Design
Liska & Associates, New York, New York
6 6
Job no:82185(CTP) Title : RP-Logolounge 2 Client : Pro-vision
Scn :
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175 Size : 228.6(w)279.4(h)mm Co : M6 C0 O/P: CTP
Dept : DTP D/O : 27.08.04 (Job no:000000 D/O : 00.00.01 Co: CM0)
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p101
LL2 100-113/M6 26/8/04 12:02 PM Page 101

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