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LogoLounge Master Library, Volume 1 by Catharine Fishel, Bill Gardner

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Job:01536 Title: Logolounge Master Library Vol 1 (Rockport)
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Job:01536 Title: Logolounge Master Library Vol 1 (Rockport)
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Job:01536 Title: Logolounge Master Library Vol 1 (Rockport)
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>
Constellations for the
Brain
Michael Doret,
Michael Doret Graphic Design
So I had this epiphany: This was where and
when my visual aesthetics were shaped! I
remembered that I had been fascinated with
lettered and hand-painted signs—from the
enameled sides of Good Humor trucks, which
roamed my Brooklyn neighborhood in summer-
time, to the huge billboards in Times Square I’d
see when I visited my dad at work.
Nobody ever said my work was subtle—and now
I understand why: Who I am and what I do was
inspired and in uenced by what we would now
call the “Pop Culture” that surrounded me as I
was growing up.
Much of your work is also very complex.
How does the human brain process and
recall a complex design like one of your
crest logos?
>
I think one tends to see and remember
patterns in images. What I like to do with my
work is create what I call “constellations” of
letters and images that somehow are tied
together by the use of pattern, repetition, form,
and color, and a very basic geometry. Any really
good art should do that.
I think the origins of contemporary logos go back
to ancient symbols, like the cross and the star,
the circle and the triangle—geometric symbols
that were imbued with magical properties by their
creators. Think of medieval heraldry and of
ancient vestments: We may not be conscious of
it, but these forms are at the root of what we now
call logos and corporate identity. These icons,
shapes, and symbols are an important part of
our past. Who knows whether or not our
responsiveness to them might even go all the
way back to the genetic level?
Michael Doret has long been respected and
admired for his ability to combine design and
illustration in identity designs that hearken from
the past, yet feel completely contemporary. His
clients have included such admirable names as
Time magazine, the NBA, the Graphic Artists
Guild, Taschen Publishing, and Disney Imagi-
neering. In this article, Doret shares how
inspirations from the past inform his work today.
Your identity and logo design work is so
distinctive. Where does your inspiration
come from?
>
How I approach my work has a lot to do with
my growing up in the 1950s in Brooklyn, near
Coney Island. I was not really aware of how this
environment had in uenced me until a few years
ago when I came across an old photo my dad
had taken of my brother and me in front of the
Tilt-A-Whirl in Coney Island. Looking at that
photo, I realized that it contained many of the
visual cues and elements that would later
become very important in my work: bright colors,
emblematic shapes, and wonderful, shaded,
outlined, and dimensional letterforms.
What I like to do with
my work is create what
I call “constellations”
of letters
AND
IMAGES
=
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