Larger systems

On larger platforms, functional issues such as backup strategies and required filesystem sizes can dictate disk layout. For example, suppose a file server is to be constructed serving 100 GB of executable data files to end users via NFS. Such a system will need enough resources to compartmentalize various parts of the directory tree into separate filesystems and might look like this:

/boot

100 MB. Keep kernels under the 1024-cylinder limit.

swap

1 GB, depending on RAM.

/

500 MB (minimum).

/usr

4 GB. All of the executables in /usr are shared to workstations via read-only NFS.

/var

2 GB. Since log files are in their own partition, they won’t threaten system stability if the filesystem is full.

/tmp

500 MB. Since temporary files are in their own partition, they won’t threaten system stability if the filesystem is full.

/home

90 GB. This big partition takes up the vast bulk of available space, offered to users for their home directories and data.

On production servers, much of the system is often placed on redundant media, such as mirrored disks. Large filesystems, such as /home, may be stored on some form of disk array using a hardware controller.

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