Safari

If you want to get something done right, you have to do it yourself.

At least that must be what Apple was thinking when it wrote its own Web browser, which so annoyed Microsoft that it promptly ceased all further work on its own Mac version of Internet Explorer.

Safari is beautiful, very fast, and filled with delicious features. It’s not, however, Internet Explorer, and so some Web sites—certain banking sites, for example—refuse to acknowledge its existence. (Read on for workarounds.) For the near term, therefore, it’s worth keeping a copy of Internet Explorer on hand for those situations when Safari can’t get its foot in the door.

Tip

Tiger doesn’t come with Internet Explorer. If you don’t have an old copy, Microsoft offers it as a free download from www.microsoft.com/mac/products/internetexplorer/internetexplorer.aspx.

The Safari window offers tools and features that let you navigate the Web almost effortlessly. These various toolbars and buttons are described in this chapter. One difference that may throw you if you’re used to other browsers: When you’re loading a Web page, the progress bar appears as a colored stripe that gradually darkens the Address bar itself, rather than as a strip at the bottom of the window.

Figure 21-1. The Safari window offers tools and features that let you navigate the Web almost effortlessly. These various toolbars and buttons are described in this chapter. One difference that may throw you if you’re used to other browsers: When you’re loading a Web page, the progress bar appears as a colored stripe that gradually darkens the Address bar itself, rather than as a strip at the bottom of the window.

Browsing Basics and Toolbars

Navigating the Web requires little more than clicking buttons and/or those underlined blue phrases, as shown in Figure 21-1 ...

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