O'Reilly logo

Mac OS® X Snow Leopard™ Bible by Mark Hattersley, Galen Gruman

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Chapter 20. Managing User Accounts

The Mac is a personal computer, so the idea of having, much less managing, a user account on your Mac may seem like a bizarre concept. After all, you're the user and it's your Mac, so why do you need an account?

If you are truly the only user of the Mac, then the idea of an account can seem unnecessary. Except that it isn't. And if more than one person uses your Mac, you definitely need to set up and manage the accounts, so each user's data, applications, and so on are kept separate for privacy, security, and stability reasons.

First, let's assume you're truly the only user of the Mac. Why bother knowing about, much less managing, a user account? The basic reason is that your Mac has an account for you whether you know it or not. And the benefit of managing that account is to set up security so if anyone else tries to use your Mac — particularly a thief — he or she is blocked by the need to enter a password to use that Mac. Passwords are tied to user accounts, so you need the user account. Plus, the user account is what Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard uses to save some of your preferences, such as the login items (the ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required