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Map Librarianship

Book Description

Map Librarianship identifies basic geoliteracy concepts and enhances reference and instruction skills by providing details on finding, downloading, delivering, and assessing maps, remotely sensed imagery, and other geospatial resources and services, primarily from trusted government sources. By offering descriptions of traditional maps, geographic information systems (GIS), remote sensing, and other geospatial technologies, the book provides a timely and practical guide for the map and geospatial librarian to blend confidence in traditional library skill sets.

  • Includes rarely discussed concepts of citing and referencing maps and geospatial data, fair use and copyright
  • Creates an awareness and appreciation of existing print map collections, while building digital stewardship with surrogate map and aerial imagery collections
  • Provides an introduction to the theory and applications of GIS, remote sensing, participatory neogeography and neocartography practices, and other geospatial technologies
  • Includes a list of geospatial resources with descriptions and illustrations of commonly used map types and formats, online geospatial data sources, and an introduction to the most commonly used geospatial software packages available, on both desktop and mobile platforms

Table of Contents

  1. Cover image
  2. Title page
  3. Table of Contents
  4. Copyright
  5. Dedication
  6. Preface
    1. Why Map Librarianship and Geoliteracy?
    2. Why Maps?
    3. Why Libraries and Librarians?
    4. Why This Book and These Co-authors?
  7. Acknowledgments
  8. Chapter 1: Introduction to Maps and Librarians
    1. Abstract
    2. 1.1 Maps: Our Spatial Compass
    3. 1.2 What is Geography?
    4. 1.3 Historic Progression of Maps and Cartographers
    5. 1.4 What Are NeoGeography and NeoCartography?
    6. 1.5 Historic Progression of Map Librarianship
    7. 1.6 What Is NeoMap Librarianship?
  9. Chapter 2: Spatial Thinking and Geo-Literacy
    1. Abstract
    2. 2.1 Geo-Literacy: Location-Based Spatial Thinking
    3. 2.2 What Is a Map?
    4. 2.3 Reference and Thematic Maps
    5. 2.4 Mapping Data—Map Symbology Techniques
    6. 2.5 The Choropleth Map
    7. 2.6 The Dot Density Map
    8. 2.7 The Proportional Symbol Map
    9. 2.8 The Cartogram
    10. 2.9 Mapping Terrain
    11. 2.10 Mapping Data—Map Types
    12. 2.11 Aeronautical Charts
    13. 2.12 Atlas and Gazetteers
    14. 2.13 Bird’s-Eye View
    15. 2.14 Coal, Oil, and Natural Gas Investigation Maps
    16. 2.15 Geologic and Mining
    17. 2.16 Historic
    18. 2.17 National Parks
    19. 2.18 Nautical Charts
    20. 2.19 Physiographic
    21. 2.20 Planimetric
    22. 2.21 Political
    23. 2.22 Soil
    24. 2.23 Topographic
    25. 2.24 Globes and Raised-Relief Models
    26. 2.25 Aerial Photography
    27. 2.26 Conclusions
  10. Chapter 3: Basic Map Concepts—The Science of Cartography
    1. Abstract
    2. 3.1 Scale and Resolution
    3. 3.2 Geodesy
    4. 3.3 Projections
    5. 3.4 North Defined
    6. 3.5 Legends
    7. 3.6 Grids and Graticules
    8. 3.7 Latitude and Longitude
    9. 3.8 Universal Transverse Mercator Coordinate System
    10. 3.9 State Plane Coordinate System
    11. 3.10 Public Land Survey System
    12. 3.11 Conclusions
  11. Chapter 4: Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing
    1. Abstract
    2. 4.1 What is a Geographic Information System?
    3. 4.2 Layering the Data
    4. 4.3 What is Remote Sensing?
    5. 4.4 The Difference Between Vector and Raster Data
    6. 4.5 Sources of Raster Data
    7. 4.6 Web GIS as a Component of NeoGeography
    8. 4.7 Volunteered Geographic Information
    9. 4.8 The Role of GPS in VGI
    10. 4.9 Conclusions
  12. Chapter 5: Terrain Mapping Meets Digital Data
    1. Abstract
    2. 5.1 Digitally Representing Terrain
    3. 5.2 Digital Raster Graphics
    4. 5.3 Digital Line Graphs
    5. 5.4 Digital Elevation Models
    6. 5.5 Conclusions
  13. Chapter 6: Map and Geospatial Librarianship
    1. Abstract
    2. 6.1 Introduction
    3. 6.2 Academic Preparation and Continuing Education
    4. 6.3 History and Transitions in Map and Geospatial Librarianship
    5. 6.4 GeoWeb and Geospatial Librarianship
    6. 6.5 Historical Beginnings—ALA and MAGIRT
    7. 6.6 Core Competencies: ALA and MAGIRT
    8. 6.7 History of Academic Curriculum to Support Map Librarianship
    9. 6.8 Transitions in Academic Curriculum to Support Map Librarianship
    10. 6.9 Job Opportunities and Challenges in Map and Geospatial Librarianship
    11. 6.10 Map Library Work Space and Equipment
    12. 6.11 Conclusions
  14. Chapter 7: Geospatial Resources and Instruction Services
    1. Abstract
    2. 7.1 Introduction
    3. 7.2 Navigating the Labyrinth—Legal Considerations
    4. 7.3 Navigating the Labyrinth—Where to Go to Get What?
    5. 7.4 Guide Through GIS and Remote Sensing Software
    6. 7.5 Guide to Finding Maps, Data, and Other Geospatial Resources
    7. 7.6 Conclusions
  15. Chapter 8: Reference Desk
    1. Abstract
    2. 8.1 Introduction
    3. 8.2 Location Matters
    4. 8.3 Reference Librarian Duties
    5. 8.4 Types of Questions
    6. 8.5 Support Groups for Map Librarianship
    7. 8.6 Citing and Referencing Maps and Geospatial Data
    8. 8.7 Conclusions
  16. Chapter 9: Collection Development
    1. Abstract
    2. 9.1 Introduction
    3. 9.2 Knowing Users and Use of Map and GIS Resources
    4. 9.3 Collection Development Policy
    5. 9.4 CDP Examples
    6. 9.5 Conclusions
  17. Chapter 10: Cataloging and Classifying
    1. Abstract
    2. 10.1 Introduction
    3. 10.2 A Brief History of Cataloging Maps
    4. 10.3 A Brief History of Classifying Maps
    5. 10.4 Classification Systems and Maps
    6. 10.5 Cataloging Cartographic Resources
    7. 10.6 Conclusions
  18. Chapter 11: Promotion and Summary of Map and GIS Resources and Services
    1. Abstract
    2. 11.1 Information Challenges
    3. 11.2 Promotion of Library Resources
    4. 11.3 Geography Awareness Week, GIS Day, and Earth Science Week
    5. 11.4 Geocaching and GPS Activities
    6. 11.5 Conclusion
    7. 11.6 In Summary of Map Librarianship
  19. Appendix A
    1. University of Illinois Library School 1951
    2. LS 306 Readings: Introduction to Maps and Map Libraries
    3. LS 306 Readings: Cartobibliographic Aids
    4. LS 306 Readings: Physical Care, Classifying, Cataloging, and Rare Maps
  20. Appendix B
  21. Appendix C
  22. Index