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Masters of Design: Corporate Brochures by Sean Adams

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Job:06-12640 Title:RP-Masters of Design-Corporate Communication
#175 DTP:174 Page:171
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Job:06-12640 Title:RP-Masters of Design-Corporate Communication
#175 DTP:174 Page:171
ordinary people who truly love design and want to share
his clients, working for the long term, and staying lean.
But in the end, he succeeds at helping a client move to
studio and client. We offer insights here, as some clients
Garth Walker
• Durban, South Africa
171
MISTER WALKER
DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA
Mister Walker founder, Garth Walker, says, “Were just
ordinary people who truly love design and want to share
the magic.” He prides himself on not being slick or trendy.
He is not interested in making complex bars and charts,
heavy-handed creative rationales, or using obliquedesign
speak.” Walker is interested inwhat it looks like,he
says. He follows this by forming genuine partnerships with
his clients, working for the long term, and staying lean.
But in the end, he succeeds at helping a client move to
a better place. The message is a vital part of the client’s
success.Generally, the message is determined by both
studio and client. We offer insights here, as some clients
arent sure of the what and the how, says Walker.
Garth Walker
Mister Walker • Durban, South Africa
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Job:06-12640 Title:RP-Masters of Design-Corporate Communication
(160)07-AC52241 #175 DTP:174 Page:172
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Job:06-12640 Title:RP-Masters of Design-Corporate Communication
(160)07-AC52241 #175 DTP:174 Page:172
He factors in the audience and the medium,
and asks three questions suggested to him by
Milton Glaser: “Who are we talking to? What do
we want to tell them? How do we want to say
it?” Walker says, “These always work for me.
Touching
Walker is not, in his words, “a web guy.” Con-
sequently, print will always be his first choice.
For Walker, print is tactile. The reader can feel
it, smell it, and read it anywhere; he can keep
it, throw it away, and carry it. “You can use it
for other stuff, like starting a barbecue. And
one day it may end up in a design book and
is remembered as a great piece,” he says.
“Interactive is only for teenagers (and they
eventually grow out of it).
Walker’s favorite projects are defined not by
a specific form or design, but if the whole
project was a pleasure. In his experience, it
is easy to lose enthusiasm for a project when
the client or printer becomes problematic.
All great work needs be fun at every step.
I like the projects that enable me to push my
boundaries or find a new way of saying what
I want to say,” Walker notes. Alternatively,
the common experience of projects that fail
is when the viewer says, “Huh? Errr what’s
this?”—when it’s impossible to understand.
And there’s quite a lot of it out there—
the designer’s ego got in the way,” he says.
It’s rarely a result of bad printing or the
wrong paper.
Politics and Design
For Walker, African clients are behind the
global issues such as sustainable practices.
He finds that most African designers’ response
is to simply print on recycled paper. At Mister
Walker, he tries to keep the green process
realistic in this environment. Currently, this
requires more green education than actually
producing sustainable printed matter. This
is one example of the most challenging com-
ponent of a project. “For us, it’s keeping the
people factor under control. Most corporations
have political dynamics that have nothing to
do with design dynamics,” says Walker. Some
designers are better suited for this than others.
“Personally, I prefer to work with individuals
than groups,” he says.
Like Glaser, Walker has a set of directives
to guide himself and others: do personal work
at all costs, find something you like doing
and do well, and never ever give up, and the
work we do to pay the bills is not what we will
be remembered for. And most importantly,
“go with your heart, park the ego, and always
remember, this is never easy.
The Top 5 Rules
1. Listen.
2. Do you really understand?
3. Do you have the right budget, printing process,
and skill set to deliver?
4. Design with honesty. Park the ego
this isn’t about you.
5. Craft till your fingers bleed.
PAGE 170 AND ABOVE
The newsletter/congress
momento was produced
for Ogilvy Worldwide
Creative Cadre Meeting
held in New Orleans.
The newsletter reflects the
event, people, images, and
an overview of discussions.
In addition, some spreads
are devoted to senior
Ogilvy Worldwide creatives
who were free to express
“whatever.” The cover
depicts an art spoof on
a traditional New Orleans
voodoo doll.
172
MASTERS OF DESIGN Corporate Brochures
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