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MCSE: Windows 2000 Exams in a Nutshell by Paul Murphy, Michael Moncur

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Managing Disk Storage

Along with the standard partitioning scheme supported by DOS, Windows 3.x, Windows 95/98/Me, and Windows NT, Windows 2000 supports a new dynamic disk system that provides greater versatility in disk management. The following sections describe the basic and dynamic disk systems and explain basic disk administration tasks.

Basic Disks

Windows 2000 refers to disks using the partitioning schemes used in previous operating systems as basic disks. In this scheme, disks are divided into one or more partitions, each of which can contain volumes (units of storage accessible with a drive letter). The two basic partition types, primary and extended, are described in the sections that follow.

Primary partitions

A primary partition is a bootable partition on a disk. Each disk can contain only one active primary partition, although partitions can be marked inactive. A primary partition contains a single volume, which can be formatted with the NTFS, FAT, or FAT32 filesystems.

Extended partitions and logical drives

An extended partition can only be created after the primary partition and typically uses the disk space unallocated to the primary partition. An extended partition is divided into one or more logical drives , each of which can be formatted as a volume.

Logical drives are not bootable. The Windows ...

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