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MCSE: Windows 2000 Exams in a Nutshell by Paul Murphy, Michael Moncur

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Designing Routing and Remote Access

Routers are used to connect subnets in a network, and are an essential element for all but the smallest networks. Routers can either be hardware devices or computers; Windows 2000 and Windows NT computers can act as routers.

Remote access is another important feature for most of today’s networks, allowing access to employees or customers across modem connections. Routing and remote access can also be combined, for example, to allow dial-up access to a remote portion of the network.

The following sections describe what you should consider when planning to use the routing and remote access features of Windows 2000 in your network design.

Basic Routing Design

Routers are an important part of most networks. They not only connect subnets, but also provide security and provide communication between dissimilar networks. The following sections describe the basics of planning a network routing design.

Router placement

Routers are generally placed between subnets; a router typically has at least two network interfaces, one for each subnet. Routers can support both persistent network connections (such as Ethernet or DSL) and non-persistent connections, such as dial-up PPP.

Routers are chiefly used in two positions: first, as a connection between subnets in a LAN or WAN, and second, as an interface to a public network, such as the Internet.

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