200 Messaging Solutions in a Linux Environment
7.1 Scenario overview
The scenario discussed in this chapter extends the one created in Chapter 6,
“Using WebSphere MQ clustering” on page 179 by building WebSphere BI
Message Broker upon the brk1 and brk2 servers.
7.1.1 Using brokers with WebSphere MQ clustering
for high availability
The WebSphere BI Message Broker topology depicted in Figure 7-1 on page 201
is used to introduce readers to WebSphere BI Message Broker and to
demonstrate how WebSphere MQ clustering can provide workload balancing
and high availability for broker-based services. Message generators will be
putting messages to queue managers not housing an instance of the cluster
queue. The queue managers will be allowed to send the messages in a
round-robin pattern to any available instance of the cluster queue. A broker
instance will retrieve the messages and insert them into an external database.
This design allows a running broker and queue manager combination to retrieve
all messages as long as one matching cluster queue is still available.
The WebSphere MQ configuration supporting this scenario is slightly different
from the configuration used in Chapter 6, “Using WebSphere MQ clustering” on
page 179. This time, the cluster queue cq is a local queue and not a remote
queue. Example 7-1 shows the commands to be executed on qmgr4 and qmgr5 to
redefine the queue cq as a local cluster queue.
Example 7-1 Redefine the queue cq as a local queue
delete qr(‘cq’)
define ql(‘cq’) defpsist(YES) defbind(NOTFIXED) cluster(ITSO)

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