Chapter 3. Implementing HA queue managers: Part 1 93
Starting MQSC for queue manager qmgr3.
dis chs(*)
1 : dis chs(*)
AMQ8417: Display Channel Status details.
CHANNEL(qmgr2.TO.qmgr3) XMITQ( )
CONNAME(192.168.10.22) CURRENT
CHLTYPE(RCVR) STATUS(RUNNING)
RQMNAME(qmgr2)
AMQ8417: Display Channel Status details.
CHANNEL(qmgr1.TO.qmgr3) XMITQ( )
CONNAME(192.168.10.20) CURRENT
CHLTYPE(RCVR) STATUS(RUNNING)
RQMNAME(qmgr1)
3.9.3 WebSphere Application Server configuration
In 3.5, “Message retrieval application” on page 73, we reviewed the
LinuxHATestEAR.ear application. For the application to work at runtime, several
WebSphere Application Server resources need to be defined.
Reviewing the application server instance
For this test, a single application server called server1 was created and started.
From the
WebSphere Application Server Administrative Console (shown in
Figure 3-12 on page 94), notice that there is only one entry for Application
Servers created.
Attention: The WebSphere Application Server installation and application
server instance creation is beyond the scope of this book. However, there is a
multitude of references to assist with these tasks. For a complete description
of installing WebSphere Application Server and configuring it to interoperate
with messaging applications, see the IBM Redbook WebSphere Application
Server V5 and WebSphere MQ Family Integration (SG24-6878-00).
94 Messaging Solutions in a Linux Environment
Figure 3-12 Application Server: server1
Because an application server has been created, the LinuxHATestEAR can be
deployed. From Install New Applications, install the EAR and accept all the
default deployment settings. Once the application is deployed and the new
configuration is saved, you can see the application from the Enterprise
Applications panel, shown in Figure 3-13.
Figure 3-13 Enterprise Application: LinuxHATestEAR
For this test, the only applications that were left installed are the adminconsole
and the test application LinuxHATestEAR.
Chapter 3. Implementing HA queue managers: Part 1 95
Now that the application is deployed, the
WebSphere MQ JMS Provider needs to
be configured. The default scope for the JMS Provider is set to Node, shown in
Figure 3-14. For this test we set the scope for the provider settings to be at the
Server level. Select Server and click Apply. For this test, the choice of scope
was an arbitrary one because there is only one application server and
application. For your environment the requirements might vary.
Figure 3-14 WebSphere MQ JMS Provider - Setting Scope to Node
Now that the scope is set, scroll to the bottom of the panel and select
WebSphere MQ Queue Connection Factories. Create a new instance and
populate the fields as shown in Figure 3-15 on page 96.
Tip: For testing purposes, it is much easier to view the tracing, logging and
configuration if there are only these two applications installed. For a real
deployment, this application server could contain many more applications.
96 Messaging Solutions in a Linux Environment
Figure 3-15 Defining linuxHATestReceiverQCF in Bindings mode
Apply the changes and save the configuration. Now that the queue connection
factory linuxHATestReceiverQCF has been defined, the list of WebSphere MQ
Queue Connection Factories should display the new configuration, shown in
Figure 3-16 on page 97.
Chapter 3. Implementing HA queue managers: Part 1 97
Figure 3-16 Completed linuxHATestReceiverQCF
Return to the WebSphere MQ JMS Provider panel and select WebSphere MQ
Queue Destinations. Create a new instance and populate the fields as shown in
Figure 3-17 on page 98.

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