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Microsoft Forefront UAG 2010 Administrator's Handbook by Ran Dolev, Erez Ben-Ari

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Literals

It is probably obvious, but we'll still mention it: a RegEx may be formed of just plain letters, which do not have any special "RegEx meaning". These are called literal characters. Such a RegEx will simply match any string that includes the RegEx literals. For example: the RegEx port.

This RegEx will be matched by the following string: port. That's it! Just one single and very specific string will match. This is a slight difference in the usage of RegEx in UAG, compared to a regular RegEx search. In a regular RegEx search, as long as the pattern defined by the RegEx—in our example here port —appears anywhere in the searched text, that is considered a match. UAG, however, is more restrictive in that the RegEx pattern must match the entire ...

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