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Microsoft® Office Access 2003 Inside Out by John L. Viescas

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Maintaining Static Web Pages

The Web pages you’ve seen thus far in this chapter are static—once you publish a page like these to a Web server, the information doesn’t change until you replace or edit the text. Actually, static Web pages are the most common type of page you’ll find on any noncommercial site on the Web. All the pages at the W3C Web site (http://www.w3.org) and all the pages on my Web site (http://www.viescas.com) are static. So, you won’t see any new information on my Web site unless I edit and update the pages.

To understand how static Web pages work (and the way the Web works in general), you need to know a bit about the architecture of the Web. Like all network applications, the World Wide Web defines two roles computers can play: ...

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