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Microsoft® Office® Professional 2013 Plain & Simple by Katherine Murray

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Creating table relationships

With Access 2013, you can easily connect the data tables you create so that you can look up information among all your connected tables. To create a relationship between tables, each table needs to have its own primary key field, which is the field that stores a unique identifier for each record in the table. That same field appears in the table with which you’re creating a relationship, and in that table, the field is identified as the foreign key. For example, the User ID field in the User IDs table is a primary key. That same field in the Contacts table is the foreign key. You can create several types of table relationships with your data tables: one-to-one (which is what you’ll learn about here); one-to-many, ...

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