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Microsoft® SQL Server™ 2000 Programming by Example by Carlos Eduardo Rojas, Fernando G. Guerrero

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Chapter 3. Working with Tables and Views

A table is the basic unit of storage in a relational database. Tables and relationships (elements that link tables) are the most important elements of the relational model, which was designed by E. F. Codd in 1970. A table is composed of columns and a set of rows. First, a column represents an attribute of the entity described by the table. For example, an employee table might have these columns: Social Security number (SSN), first name, and last name. Second, a row, or a tuple, contains the actual data that is stored in a table. In the employee's example, if there are 10 employees in the company, this table will contain 10 rows.

A database object similar to tables in the way it is queried is a view. A ...

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