O'Reilly logo

Microsoft® Visual Basic® 2010 Developer’s Handbook by Klaus Löffelmann and Sarika Calla Purohit

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Delegates

When programming, the statements you write in a high-level language are translated into op-codes (byte command sequences) that can be interpreted and run by the different processor cores. You can get an idea of how this works by setting a breakpoint in a line of your program in the Editor by pressing F9, starting your program, running it to the breakpoint, and then executing the command Disassembly in the Debug menu under Window. Figure 15-4 shows a Visual Basic example of how this looks in the assembler.

The Disassembly window shows how the individual lines of your program look from the processor’s point of view: These are real byte sequences that represent the Assembler op-codes (the data the processor understands as commands).

Figure 15-4. The Disassembly window shows how the individual lines of your program look from the processor’s point of view: These are ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required