O'Reilly logo

Microsoft® Visual C#® 2008 Step by Step by John Sharp

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Web Services, Clients, and Proxies

You have seen that a Web service uses SOAP to provide a mechanism for receiving requests and sending back results. SOAP uses XML to format the data being transmitted, which rides on top of the HTTP protocol used by Web servers and browsers. This is what makes Web services so powerful—SOAP, HTTP, and XML are well understood (in theory anyway) and are the subjects of several standards committees. Any client application that "talks" SOAP can communicate with a Web service. So how does a client "talk" SOAP? There are two ways: the difficult way and the easy way.

Talking SOAP: The Difficult Way

In the difficult way, the client application performs a number of steps. It must do the following:

  1. Determine the URL of the ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required