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Mobile Intelligence by Bala Srinivasan, Ling Tan, Jianhua Ma, Agustinus Borgy Waluyo, Laurence T. Yang

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25.3 TRACKING TECHNIQUES

Recently, numerous techniques to tracking in WSNs have been paying much attention to two goals: target tracking [1, 2, 79, 12, 16, 18, 19, 2123] and event boundary determination [3, 4, 10, 11, 13, 15]. The approaches to target tracking focus on identifying the location of the static or mobile target, such as a car in the highway, a tank in the battlefield, or a wild animal in the national park. Alternatively, the approaches to event boundary determination concentrate on determining the edge of the event of interest by using the sensors around the exact boundary of such event.

25.3.1 Target Tracking

Overall, the majority of the existing approaches to target tracking in WSNs are classified into the tree construction, clustering, and stochastic techniques. Here, we present the representative protocols corresponding to the individual category.

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Figure 25.3 Illustration of a convoy tree, whose root is a car (adapted from [21]).

25.3.1.1 Tree Construction Approaches

Zhang and Cao [21] propose a tree-based collaboration (DCTC) framework to target tracking in WSNs. Basically, DCTC constructs a tree, called the convoy tree to form an efficient topology for moving target tracking. Two significant properties are involved in such convoy tree. The first property is that a convoy tree is composed of the sensors around the target and the second is that a convoy tree is ...

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