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Modeling Business Objects with XML Schema

Book Description

XML Schema is the new language standard from the W3C and the new foundation for defining data in Web-based systems. There is a wealth of information available about Schemas but very little understanding of how to use this highly formal specification for creating documents. Grasping the power of Schemas means going back to the basics of documents themselves, and the semantic rules, or grammars, that define them. Written for schema designers, system architects, programmers, and document authors, Modeling Business Objects with XML Schema guides you through understanding Schemas from the basic concepts, type systems, type derivation, inheritance, namespace handling, through advanced concepts in schema design.

*Reviews basic XML syntax and the Schema recommendation in detail.
*Builds a knowledge base model step by step (about jazz music) that is used throughout the book.
*Discusses Schema design in large environments, best practice design patterns, and Schema's relation to object-oriented concepts.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover image
  2. Title page
  3. Table of Contents
  4. Praise for Modeling Business Objects with XML Schema
  5. Copyright
  6. Acknowledgements
  7. Foreword
  8. Introduction
  9. PART I: THE MODEL
    1. Chapter 1: Foundations
      1. 1.1 A CORE CONCEPT
      2. 1.2 LINEAR CONCEPTS
      3. 1.3 NONLINEAR CONCEPTS
      4. 1.4 DOCUMENT-CENTRIC VS. DATA-CENTRIC CONTENT
      5. 1.5 DOCUMENT SCHEMATA
      6. 1.6 GRAMMARS
      7. 1.7 REGULAR TYPES
    2. Chapter 2: Conceptual Modeling
      1. 2.1 MOTIVATION
      2. 2.2 PRINCIPLES OF CONCEPTUAL MODELING
      3. 2.3 ENTITY RELATIONSHIP DIAGRAMS
      4. 2.4 REALITY OF CONCEPTUAL MODELING
      5. 2.5 INTRODUCING ASSET ORIENTED MODELING
    3. Chapter 3: Everybody Likes Jazz
      1. 3.1 INFORMAL DESCRIPTION
      2. 3.2 THE CONCEPTUAL MODEL, FIRST DRAFT
      3. 3.3 ASSET OR PROPERTY?
      4. 3.4 NORMALIZATION
      5. 3.5 PARTITIONED NORMAL FORM
      6. 3.6 RESOLVING is_a RELATIONSHIPS
      7. 3.7 INTRODUCING LEVEL 2 STRUCTURES
  10. PART II: THE IMPLEMENTATION
    1. Chapter 4: XML Basics
      1. 4.1 NAMESPACES
      2. 4.2 THE XML INFORMATION MODEL
      3. 4.3 XML CANONICAL FORM
      4. 4.4 THE DOCUMENT TYPE DEFINITION (DTD)
    2. Chapter 5: XML Schema
      1. 5.1 AN APPETIZER
      2. 5.2 SIMPLE DATA TYPES
      3. 5.3 STRUCTURE IN XML SCHEMA
      4. 5.3.1 Hierarchy
      5. 5.3.2 Elements and Complex Types
      6. 5.3.3 Particles and Model Groups
    3. Chapter 6: Authoring XML Schema
      1. 6.1 NAMESPACES
      2. 6.2 REUSE MECHANISMS
      3. 6.3 SCHEMA COMPOSITION
      4. 6.4 USAGE PATTERNS
    4. Chapter 7: Relax NG
      1. 7.1 STRUCTURE
      2. 7.2 TYPES, GRAMMARS, PATTERNS
      3. 7.3 NAMESPACES AND NAME CLASSES
    5. Chapter 8: From Conceptual Model to Schema
      1. 8.1 A KNOWLEDGE BASE
      2. 8.2 IMPLEMENTATION IN XML SCHEMA
      3. 8.3 IMPLEMENTATION IN RELAX NG
      4. 8.4 SUMMARY
    6. Chapter 9: Validation beyond XML Schema
      1. 9.1 ABOUT MEANING
      2. 9.2 CONSTRAINTS
      3. 9.3 CONSTRAINTS IN CONCEPTUAL MODELS
      4. 9.4 VALIDATION OF GENERAL CONSTRAINTS
      5. 9.5 AN XML PROCESSING MODEL
      6. 9.6 A FRAMEWORK FOR SCHEMA LANGUAGES
  11. PART III: THE ENVIRONMENT
    1. Chapter 10: Reality Check: The World Is Object-Oriented
      1. 10.1 OBJECT-ORIENTED IMPLEMENTATIONS OF THE XML DATA MODEL
      2. 10.2 ENCAPSULATION AND BEHAVIOR
      3. 10.3 CLASS, INSTANCE, TYPE
      4. 10.4 SIMPLE TYPES
      5. 10.5 COMPLEX TYPES
      6. 10.6 GLOBAL TYPES
      7. 10.7 INHERITANCE
      8. 10.8 POLYMORPHISM
      9. 10.9 DYNAMIC MARSHALING
      10. 10.10 CONSTRAINTS
      11. 10.11 IDENTITY
      12. 10.12 VISIBILITY
    2. Chapter 11: Reality Check: The World Is Relational
      1. 11.1 MOTIVATION
      2. 11.2 DATABASES
      3. 11.3 THE RELATIONAL DATA MODEL
      4. 11.4 THE RELATIONAL ALGEBRA
      5. 11.5 NORMALIZATION
      6. 11.6 BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO SQL
      7. 11.7 SIMPLE DATA TYPES
      8. 11.9 CONSTRAINTS
      9. 11.10 FROM RELATIONAL TABLES TO XML SCHEMA
      10. 11.11 MEDIATION BETWEEN RDBMS AND XML DATABASES
    3. Chapter 12: Schema Evolution
      1. 12.1 DERIVED TYPES
      2. 12.2 AUTHORING FOR REDEFINITION
      3. 12.3 OPEN CONTENT MODEL
      4. 12.4 VERSIONING
    4. Chapter 13: Schemata in Large Environments
      1. 13.1 COMBINING DIVERSE SCHEMATA
      2. 13.2 CENTRALIZED AND DECENTRALIZED CHANGE MANAGEMENT
    5. Chapter 14: Outlook
      1. 14.1 INTEGRATION OF CORE TECHNOLOGIES
      2. 14.2 GRAMMAR-DRIVEN DATA MODELS
  12. Regular Expressions for Patterns
  13. Glossary
  14. Bibliography
  15. Index
  16. About the Author