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Money, Blood and Revolution: How Darwin and the doctor of King Charles I could turn economics into a science by George Cooper

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4. Blood and Bacon

“Galen’s anatomy and physiology were not in need of improvement, as Renaissance anatomists had attempted, but of complete rejection.”

Andrew Gregory (Gregory, 2001)

William Harvey (1578–1657) was born 35 years after the death of Copernicus, and as a result would have grown up and been educated as the revolutionary Copernican theory was spreading throughout northern Europe. Like Copernicus he was the son of a wealthy family and was also able to study at the elite University of Padua, where he specialised in medicine and anatomy.

Harvey qualified as a physician in Padua, whereupon he returned to his native England and took up a position at St Bartholomew’s hospital in London. Harvey was eventually to rise to become physician ...

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