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Moving Media Storage Technologies

Book Description

Complex media storage computer systems are employed by broadcasters, digital cinemas, digital signage, and other business and entertainment venues to capture, store and retrieve moving media content on systems that will preserve the original integrity of the content over time and technological transition. This book provides detailed information related to the concepts, applications, implementation and interfaces of video file servers, intelligent storage systems, media asset management services, content distribution networks, and mission critical platforms.

A tutorial and case example approach is taken to facilitate a thorough understanding of the technologies, using numerous illustrations, tables and examples. The text and appendices are designed to provide easy to access valuable reference and historical information.


.A focus on the media serving concepts and principles employed at the enterprise level

.Practical and technological summaries of the applications and linkages between media asset management and storage technologies for studio, television, and media production workflows

.Illustrations, standards, tables, and practical summaries serve as handy reference tools

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Full Title
  3. Copyright
  4. Contents
  5. Acknowledgements
  6. Introduction
  7. Chapter 1 Information, Data, and Video
    1. Data Structure
    2. Information
    3. Storing the Moving Image
    4. Digital Video Recording
    5. Analog Component Video
    6. Colorimetry and Conversion
    7. A Digital Media World: Going Forward
    8. Further Readings
  8. Chapter 2 Digital Disk Recording
    1. Recording Moving Images
    2. Dawn of the Video Disk
    3. Fundamentals of Digital Disk Recording
    4. Core Technologies for Digital Disk Recording
    5. DDR, DVR, or Videoserver
    6. Comparing DDRs to Videoservers
    7. Clip Servers
    8. DVR Marketplaces
    9. Home Media Network Disk Recorders
    10. Audio
    11. Further Readings
  9. Chapter 3 Video Media Servers
    1. Carrying Over from the DDR
    2. Universal Server Approach
    3. Videoservers as Media Servers
    4. The Future of Videoservers
    5. Communications Protocols Used in Video Serving Platforms
    6. Further Readings
  10. Chapter 4 Hard Drive Anatomy
    1. Magnetic Recording History
    2. Drive Components
    3. Disk Performance Optimization
    4. Disk Scheduling
    5. Access Time Components
    6. Servicing and Scheduling Criteria
    7. Capacity Factors, Transfer Time and Obstacles
    8. Read–Write Heads
    9. Advanced Format Sector Technology
    10. Superparamagnetic Limit
    11. Heat-Assisted Magnetic Recording
    12. Further Reading
  11. Chapter 5 Buses, Ports, and Interfaces
    1. Carrying and Transferring Data
    2. Bus Types
    3. Storage Bus Standards
    4. Storage Module Device
    5. Serial Storage Architecture
    6. High-Performance Parallel Interface
    7. IDE
    8. Parallel ATA
    9. SCSI
    10. Further Readings
  12. Chapter 6 SATA, SAS, and RAID
    1. Transitioning from Parallel to Serial Technologies
    2. Serial Attached SCSI (SAS)
    3. SATA
    4. RAID
    5. Alternative Disk Sets and Configurations
    6. Error Prevention Methods
    7. Conclusions
    8. Further Readings
  13. Chapter 7 Solid State Disks
    1. Solid State Storage Evolution
    2. Dynamic Random Access Memory
    3. Flash Memory
    4. Flash Memory Functionality
    5. Portability and Green Perspectives
    6. Supplementing Video on Demand with SSD
    7. Further Readings
  14. Chapter 8 Optical Storage Media
    1. Defining Removable Media
    2. Optical Media Definitions
    3. Blu-ray Disc
    4. Holographic Storage
    5. Care and Handling
    6. Further Readings
  15. Chapter 9 Interchange, Transcoding, and Wrappers
    1. Moving Toward Non-Real Time
    2. Compressed Video
    3. Issues with Interchange
    4. Media File Vocabularies and Terminologies
    5. Content
    6. Material eXchange Format (MXF)
    7. Task Force for MXF
    8. Operational Patterns
    9. Specialized Operational Pattern Atom
    10. Items and Packages
    11. Essence Container
    12. Conversion and Transcoding
    13. Converting Audio and Video Essence
    14. Transcode Pipeline
    15. Multiplatform Conversion and Distribution
    16. Examples and Conclusions
    17. Further Readings
  16. Chapter 10 IP Storage
    1. Internet Protocol
    2. Delivering Packets by IP
    3. Connected or Connectionless
    4. IP Address Classes
    5. Addresses
    6. Domain Naming
    7. Ethernet
    8. Internet Engineering Task Force
    9. IP Storage
    10. iSCSI
    11. iSCSI RFCs
    12. iSCSI Protocol
    13. Initiator–Target Messages
    14. Transfer Directions
    15. Network Address Authority (NAA)
    16. iFCP
    17. Gateway Protocol to TCP/IP
    18. Provisions
    19. Fabric
    20. iFCP Services
    21. Transport Services
    22. Other
    23. Security
    24. Fibre Channel Over IP (FCIP)
    25. Complementary
    26. Nominal Distances
    27. FCIP Link
    28. Clarification
    29. Internet Storage Name Service (iSNS)
    30. iSNS Architectural Components
    31. iSNS Protocol (iSNSP)
    32. iSNS Client
    33. iSNS servers
    34. iSNS Database
    35. What iSNS Does
    36. Unified Discovery and Management
    37. Fiber Channel Discovery
    38. Zoning
    39. Using SCN Functions
    40. Distributed Intelligence
    41. IP Storage Support
    42. Quality of Service for IP Storage Networks
    43. Class of Service (CoS)
    44. Traffic Prioritization
    45. TOS Precedence
    46. Differentiated Services
    47. Performance Predictability
    48. Traffic Shaping
    49. Theory and Research
    50. Variable Delay
    51. Throttling Decisions
    52. Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP)
    53. Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS)
    54. MPLS Transport Profile
    55. InfiniBand
    56. IP Storage Considerations
    57. IP Switches and Routers
    58. Determining the Need
    59. Logical Separation Points
    60. Security Considerations
    61. Ports and Connectivity
    62. Other Features
    63. Management Tools
    64. Acceleration and Compression
    65. Security
    66. Authentication
    67. Fibre Channel—Security Protocol (FC-SP)
    68. Device Identity
    69. Authorization
    70. Encryption
    71. Auditing
    72. Integrity Checking
    73. Quality of Service (QoS)
    74. Further Readings
  17. Chapter 11 Object-Based Storage
    1. Introduction: Objects
    2. Storage Categories
    3. Storage Interface Progression
    4. Parallel Heading
    5. Applications of OSD
    6. Further Readings
  18. Chapter 12 Archives, Backups, and Linear Tape
    1. Organizational Requirements for Data
    2. Legal Requirements for Archive or Backup
    3. Repacking and Repurposing
    4. Added Operational Requirements
    5. Backup or Archive: There are Differences
    6. Backups
    7. Acting like Archives
    8. Data Backups—Not Archives
    9. Internal Application-Specifi c Backups
    10. Archive and Transfer Management—Nonlinear Editing
    11. Differentiation
    12. Archiving for Discovery
    13. Data Archiving
    14. Tape or Disk
    15. Pros and Cons
    16. Self-Protecting Storage Systems
    17. Disk Archiving Pluses
    18. Tape Archiving Pluses
    19. Storage Retention Period
    20. Disadvantages of Tape
    21. Legacy Tape Archive Problems
    22. Standards-Based Archive Approaches
    23. Common Backup Formats
    24. Determining the Right Archiving Method
    25. Cloud Data Protection
    26. Cloud Benefits
    27. Scaling
    28. Services Provided
    29. Holographic Storage for the Archive
    30. RAIT
    31. Mirroring—Level 1 RAIT
    32. Data Striping—Level 3 RAIT
    33. Data Striping—Level 5 RAIT
    34. Not for Random Access
    35. Automated Tape Libraries (ATL)
    36. Stackers, Autoloaders, or Libraries
    37. Server and Archive Components
    38. Evolution in Digital Tape Archives
    39. Tape Technology Basics
    40. Tape Metrics
    41. Linear Serpentine
    42. Helical Scan Recording
    43. Historical Development of Data Tape
    44. QIC and DAT
    45. Travan
    46. 8 mm Recording Technologies
    47. Tape Error Detection
    48. Tape Media Formats and Fabrication Parameters
    49. Metal Particle to Advanced Metal Evaporated
    50. Advanced Intelligent Tape (AIT)
    51. Super and Turbo AIT
    52. Digital Data Storage (DDS)
    53. Data Storage Technology (DST)
    54. Digital Tape Format (DTF)
    55. Advanced Tape Materials
    56. Digital Linear Tape (DLT)
    57. Error Detection
    58. Adaptive Cache Buffering
    59. Compression Algorithms
    60. Duty Cycle
    61. DLT1 Drive
    62. Super DLT
    63. Roadmaps for SDLT
    64. Linear Tape Open (LTO)
    65. Genealogy
    66. Ultrium—First Generation
    67. LTO Generation 1
    68. LTO Generation 2
    69. LTO Generation 3
    70. LTO Generation 4
    71. LTO Generation 5
    72. LTFS
    73. LTO Program Roadmap
    74. Security WORM
    75. Why Use Tape?
    76. Data Archiving and Tape Storage
    77. Preparing for the Archive
    78. Future Standards
  19. Chapter 13 Metadata and Media Asset Management
    1. Media Management Systems
    2. Media Assets and Content
    3. Content Management System
    4. Web-Based CMS
    5. Digital Asset Management
    6. Asset Management System
    7. Media Asset Management
    8. Tape-Based MAM
    9. Drawbacks to Tape-Based Systems
    10. MAM for Videoserver Implementations
    11. Lack of Media Asset Integration
    12. Collaboration Issues
    13. Metadata
    14. Media-Centric Metadata
    15. Structural Metadata
    16. Descriptive Metadata
    17. Interoperability
    18. Dublin Core
    19. PBCore
    20. Usage Metadata
    21. Schemas
    22. Standards, Practices, and Policies for Metadata
    23. Storing Metadata
    24. Metadata Services
    25. Media Application Services
    26. Messaging Services for MAM
    27. Intelligent Integrated MAM
    28. Workflow Management
    29. Collaboration among Multiple Users
    30. Tool Set Integration
    31. Centralized Database
    32. Multi-Tier Architecture
    33. Scalability
    34. Storage for MAM
    35. Latency
    36. Interfacing with Production Storage
    37. Archive
    38. Further Readings
  20. Chapter 14 Clustering
    1. Why Use Clusters?
    2. Physical Components
    3. Capabilities and Types of Clustering
    4. Cluster Scaling Characteristics
    5. Shared Structures
    6. Managing Storage Clusters for Scalability
    7. Grid Computing
    8. Summary
    9. Further Readings
  21. Chapter 15 Networked Storage
    1. Networked Storage—Fundamentals
    2. Networks
    3. Network-Attached Storage
    4. Direct Access File System
    5. Storage Area Network
    6. Fibre Channel SAN Components
    7. Next Generation SANs
    8. Further Readings
  22. Chapter 16 High-Performance and Shared Storage
    1. Applications for High-Performance Storage
    2. Size Matters
    3. Intelligent Adaptive Storage
    4. Storage Accelerators
    5. Storage Appliance Technologies
    6. Real-World Performance
    7. Shared Storage Implementations
    8. Storage Scaling and Management
    9. Further Readings
  23. Chapter 17 Scalability, Extensibility, and Interoperability
    1. Scalability
    2. Flexibility
    3. Reliability
    4. Accessibility and Availability
    5. Extensibility
    6. Interoperability
    7. Science and Technology
    8. Further Readings
  24. Chapter 18 Storage Management
    1. Storage System Dependencies
    2. Storage Management Concepts
    3. Electronic Media Management
    4. Fragmentation
    5. SAN Management
    6. NAS Management
    7. Snapshots
    8. Data Deduplication
    9. Further Readings
  25. Chapter 19 Resilience, Fault Tolerance, and Virtualization
    1. Resilience
    2. Storage Tiering
    3. Protecting Data and Storage
    4. Virtualization in File-Based Storage
    5. Fault Tolerance
    6. Conclusion
    7. Further Readings
  26. Index