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Music Theory for Computer Musicians by Michael Hewitt

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10. Melody and Motives

When you are writing music, you’ll spend a lot of time thinking about leads and basses—in other words, melodic lines. Melodic lines involve a series of pitch changes. These changes define the melodic intervals that make up the line. Thus, you can think of a melodic line as having two distinct axes—an axis of pitch (the vertical axis) and an axis of time through which changes in pitch occur (the horizontal axis); see Figure 10.1.

Figure 10.1. Axes of pitch and time in melody.

To accommodate both of these elements, sequencer windows are organized along the same lines (see Figure 10.2). On the left side is a keyboard representing ...

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