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Music Theory for Computer Musicians by Michael Hewitt

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13. Chordal Inversions, Octave Doubling, and Spacing

Any piece of music that you write will no doubt be based on a sequence of chords. From previous chapters, you have gathered that such a sequence is called a chord progression. The use of such chord progressions gives the succession of individual events within your composition a sense of coherence and logic. The ear recognizes the progression and makes sense of the music accordingly.

Chord progressions also serve to connect the different simultaneous layers of your tracks. Examples of these layers are the main lead, bass line, accompaniment (such as guitar strums or keyboard arpeggios), pads, strings, and so on. Each of these layers contributes its own particular part to the music. But the ...

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