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One Watercolor a Day by Veronica Lawlor

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(Fogra 29_WF)Job:07-30996 Title:RP-One Watercolor A Day
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Two Women, by Despina Georgiadis,
watercolor, colored pencil, scratched
in paint
Chapter 1:
MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES
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(Ray)
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(Ray)
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12 O N E WATERCOLOR A DAY
(Text)
Before you begin the exercises of this book, you’ll need a
few supplies.
PAINT Watercolor paint comes in tubes or in pans. The
tube paint squeezes out as pure color and can be mixed on a
palette or used straight from the tube for the most vibrancy
of hue. Pan colors are convenient for location work, and if
you wet them down enough, they can become almost as
vibrant as the tube paints. I recommend purchasing a set of
pan colors, at least twenty-four, and several tubes of paint.
You’ll want minimally all of the primary and secondary
colors, as well as a little tube of white for semiopacity. Pick
a few more colors based on your taste, for variety, if you can
afford to. You don’t need grays unless you want to buy them:
Mixing colors with their complements will gray them down
considerably. Paints come in student and professional grade:
Purchase the one that fits your budget. If you are on a budget,
purchase more colors of student-grade paint and fewer colors
of the professional. A small plastic palette that closes (good
on location) will be important as a surface to mix paints on.
You can squeeze your tube paints onto the palette, and rewet
them each time you work. A small spray bottle of water is
also helpful, to wet both your tube paints and pan paints
before you begin to work.
You will also need a few tubes of gouache, an opaque
water-based paint. Purchase the three primaries and
secondary colors for mixing, plus white, and a few other
colors by taste.
BRUS HES You’ll want several different sizes and types of
brushes to work with. Pure sable is the best; if that’s beyond
your budget, try a mixed sable and synthetic or a good
synthetic. I rely mainly on three round brushes: one small
(size 3 or 4), one medium (size 10 or 12), and one large (size
22). Look for brushes that have a sharp point and flexibility—
the shape should pop back easily when snapped. You’ll also
want two flat brushes, one large for color washes and one
small for blending or lifting off colors from the page. Pick up
a fan brush as well for blending if you’d like, for fun.
PAPER Watercolor paper comes in sheets, in pads, or in a
block. Try a few finishes in sheet form and then buy your
preference. Sheets give you a chance to buy one at a time,
pads can be convenient, and the block is nice for painting
with a lot of wet washes because it will hold the paper tight
and keep it from buckling. Heavier paper buckles less, too,
and stands up to a lot of scrubbing. You can also tape your
watercolor paper down to a board if you want to avoid
buckling: Let the painting dry before removing your work
from the board.
What You’ll Need
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