O'Reilly logo

Organic Chemistry I For Dummies, 2nd Edition by Arthur Winter

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Chapter 4

Covering the Bases (And the Acids)

In This Chapter

arrow Defining acids and bases

arrow Comparing acidities of organic molecules

arrow Seeing pKa values

arrow Predicting the directions of acid-base equilibria

You’ve surely done some acid-base chemistry in your lifetime, or at least observed some. Have you ever put lemon juice on fish to neutralize the fishy odors? Have you ever made a bottle rocket or fake volcano using baking soda and vinegar? Have you ever baked bread, cookies, or cakes? If so, then you’ve done acid-base chemistry. Certainly, you’ve dealt with acids and bases at some point. Foods such as tomatoes, oranges, lemons, sodas, and coffee are acidic, while household items such as bleach, ammonia, baking soda, and soaps are basic.

In fact, almost every reaction in organic chemistry involves acid-base chemistry — almost every one of them. Understanding how acids and bases work, therefore, is critical in understanding the reactions of organic molecules.

In this chapter, I define acids and bases using the three prominent definitions in use today. I show you how you can qualitatively predict ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required