Job Aid:
Anatomy of Performance Diagram (AOP)
Geary Rummler and his colleagues have been using the Anatomy
of Performance (AOP) diagram in a variety of formats for many
years. A blank AOP form is included on the next page.
Examples of the diagram are shown in the book to describe Acme
Landscaping and to describe the Wilma/Wilber/Tammy/Tommy
family. Another example of the Anatomy of Performance diagram is
shown on page 171. It has a slightly different format than the ones
for Acme and for Wilma et al.
I use the AOP format when I want to get started, but not pull out a
lot of detail. This format reminds the client that there are four classic
categories of inputs (money, materials, people, and know-how). It
does not go into the sources of these inputs and does not divide the
input “money” into “capital” and “revenue.” The Marketplace box
helps the analyst emphasize that for-profit and not-for-profit organi-
zations are both money generators and products/services genera-
tors. It is quite true that for both analyst and client, “the devil is in
the details.” The AOP provides a context for understanding and pri-
oritizing those details.
If a client asks me to work on an internal process, I will first empha-
size those boxes and then ask about the Marketplace as we try to
figure out what to measure in order to measure “performance
improvement.”
If I do not know which version of the diagram I should use, I start
with any version and, as the client and I work to fill it in, we would
decide which issues are the Critical Business Issues and work from
there.
170 Performance Analysis
Systemic View: Your Organization
Marketplace
Marketplace Processes
Internal Processes
Revenue
Technology
and Know-How
Materials
Labor
$
Products/Services
Competitors for Resources
Competitors for Customers
Appendix A 171
Systemic View: Any Organization
Financial
Consumer
Marketplace
Organization Management/
Information Management
Product/Service
Subsystem
Financial Management
Subsystem
Materials Management
Subsystem
People/Labor
Management Subsystem
Marketplace Processes
Internal Processes
Revenue
Technology
and Know-How
Materials
Labor
$
Products/Services
Competitors for Resources
Competitors for Customers
Environmental Influences: Economic, social, governmental, state and
national culture, regional business conditions, etc.

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