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Photographing Rivers, Lakes, and Falling Water by Robert Correll

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Shooting Falling Water

Photographing falling water presents different challenges than rivers or lakes. Whether wide or narrow, rivers extend up- and downstream. Even small lakes can be pretty large. Waterfalls and fountains are typically much smaller. This affects the angles you can use and your composition.

Keep in mind that natural waterfalls aren’t around every bend. You may have to put some effort into finding one and getting to it. Fountains and other human-made waterfalls are more common, and can even be indoors, which can be very interesting. Once you locate your subject, you’ll have to decide whether you want to freeze water’s motion or allow the moving water to blur into an ethereal fog. Each approach produces vastly different results. ...

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