Chapter 17. The Supreme Court of the United States

The Supreme Court of the United States

The west side of the Supreme Court Building of the United States. Taken at ISO 200, f/11, 1/125 second with a 20mm lens.

Why It's Worth a Photograph

The Supreme Court of the United States presides over all federal and state courts and bears the ultimate authority for the interpretation of the Constitution of the United States of America.

The U.S. Supreme Court was 146 years old before it finally got its own building in 1935. Prior to that, the Court's judges met over the years in a series of rooms within the U.S. Capitol until Chief Justice William Howard Taft (the former President of the United States) persuaded Congress to give the Supreme Court a building of its own.

Where Can I Get the Best Shot?

The front of the Supreme Court Building faces west. Its 16 marble columns, grand steps, and pediment that reads "Equal Justice Under Law" are all at once imposing and monumental. It's a beautiful sight that even the most jaded Washingtonian can't pass without taking a second glance.

The best locations from which to photograph the Supreme Court of the United States: (A) west exterior facing east, (B) main steps, and (C) marble columns at west entrance. Nearby photo ops: (19) Ulysses S. Grant Memorial, (21) United States Botanic Garden, (22) United States Capitol, and (23) United States Library of Congress.

Figure 17.1. The best locations from which to photograph the Supreme Court of the United States: (A) west exterior facing east, (B) main steps, and (C) marble columns at west entrance. Nearby photo ops: (19) Ulysses S. Grant Memorial, (21) United States Botanic Garden, ...

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