the re
p
ort should footnote or make other references to the exh
i
b
i
ts that su
pp
ort the find
i
n
g
or other-
wise illustrate the point being made
.
I
t is very useful to users of such large reports to receive the reports in both written form (fre-
q
uentl
y
re
q
u
i
r
i
n
g
several b
i
nders and boxes
)
and d
igi
tal form
(
com
p
uter d
i
skette or CD
).
S
U
MMA
RY
W
hether in standard chronological or large report form the finished investigative report is a reflectio
n
of the skill level of the investigator. Effective report writers will observe and remember these basi
c
p
r
i
nc
ip
les
:
1. Use a personal notebook that will serve as a basis for your report
.
2. Wr
i
te as thou
g
h
y
ou are tell
i
n
g
someone what ha
pp
ened
.
3
. Use small, easy-to-understand words. Avoid technical or professional terms if possible. If
that is not possible, define or explain the terms.
4. Be
i
m
p
art
i
al and ob
j
ect
i
ve
i
n what
y
ou re
p
ort.
5. Report only what you know to be a fact; do not report assumptions
.
6. Normally, write the report as a chronological unfolding of events
.
7
. Be certa
i
n the re
p
ort
i
s understandable
i
n terms of what actuall
y
ha
pp
ened.
8
. Be certain that important information is not omitted
.
9. Be prepared to support quotes with notes. Quote exactly. If offensive or obscene language
i
s used,
q
uote
i
t, dont soften
i
t.
10. Be sure the report raises no unanswered questions
.
Ch
apter 14 Report Writin
g
an
d
Note Takin
g
19
3
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