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Raspberry Pi For Dummies by Mike Cook, Sean McManus

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Chapter 17

The Raspberry Pi in an Analog World

In This Chapter

arrow Discovering what analog means

arrow Creating the Raspberry Ripple

arrow Making a Steve Reich machine

arrow Building a light-controlled instrument

arrow Making a thermometer

In the previous two chapters, we showed how the Raspberry Pi could sense logic levels on the GPIO pins when they were configured to be inputs. We also showed how you could switch LEDs on and off when GPIO pins were configured to be outputs. We also showed how, by using a transistor, you can use the Pi to control much larger currents than you can get directly from the GPIO pins.

In this chapter, we show you how to use the GPIO to talk to other integrated circuits. There are many ways to do this, called protocols. This chapter concentrates on one called the I2C protocol. Many integrated circuits use this protocol to allow you to do many things. However, one very different sort of thing is how to input and output, not in the strict on/off way of the digital world you have ...

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