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Raspberry Pi For Dummies by Mike Cook, Sean McManus

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Logging In

When you switch on your Raspberry Pi, you might be asked for a username and password. The default username and password differ depending on which version of Linux you are using, but for the Raspbian Wheezy distribution, the username is pi and the password is raspberry. Both of these are case-sensitive, so you can’t type in PI, for example. You receive no feedback on the screen as you enter the password. It not only hides your password, but also doesn’t show you that a key press happened, which is a bit unsettling the first time. Press on regardless and you should find your login details are accepted.

After logging in, you are shown the command line prompt followed by a blinking line:

pi@raspberrypi ~ $

This means your Raspberry Pi is ready for you to use and you can enter Linux commands now to manage your files and programs.

Chapter 4 shows you how to get from here to the desktop environment, which uses windows and icons, and how you can use it to browse the web, manage your files, view your images, edit text files, and more.

Chapter 5 shows you how you can use the Linux command line to manage your Raspberry Pi and its files.

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