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Raspberry Pi For Dummies by Mike Cook, Sean McManus

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Using a Remote Control

With all of the functionality we’ve covered in this chapter, you’re not that far away from running a low-power home media center. To complete it, you can use a remote control.

There are many ways to remotely control Raspbmc. You can use a USB device, a cheap infrared remote, a keyboard remote, or even your Xbox controller, if you have one. Or you can use the existing XBMC remote app (available for iOS and Android operating systems) to talk to your Raspberry Pi over your home network via Wi-Fi.

The Raspbmc page at www.raspbmc.com/wiki/user/ includes a list of compatible remote controls.

tip.eps You can find the remote control settings in the System menu, the System tab, and then under Input devices.

If you have a television that supports the HDMI CEC (Consumer Electronics Council) standard, a neat option is to enable your existing television remote to control your Raspbmc Pi. To do this, connect your networked Pi to your television’s HDMI socket. XMBC appears as a new input. Use the TV’s remote control to change to this input, and your Raspbmc Home screen appears on the television. You can find a demonstration video, together with a link to some Raspberry Pi media center software that has been modified to support CEC, at www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPyOyJsnB1o .

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