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Raspberry Pi For Dummies by Mike Cook, Sean McManus

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Understanding the Scratch Screen Layout

Scratch divides the screen into four main areas, as you can see in Figure 10-1. In the top right is the Stage, where you can see your game or animation take shape. There’s a cat on it already, so you can get started straight away by making him do things, as you’ll see in a minute.

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Scratch is developed by the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab. See http://scratch.mit.edu .

Figure 10-1: The screen layout when you first start Scratch.

The bottom right area is your Sprite List. You can think of sprites as the characters in your game. They’re images that you can make do things, such as move around or change their appearance. For now, there’s just the cat, which has the name Sprite1.

You create a Scratch program by snapping together blocks, which are short instructions. On the left, you can see the Blocks Palette, which currently shows the Motion blocks, which include instructions to move 10 steps, rotate, go to a particular grid reference, and point in a particular direction.

The tall middle panel is the Scripts Area. This is where the magic happens! You assemble your program in this space, by dragging blocks into it from the left.

You can use two buttons in the top right (indicated in Figure 10-1) to toggle the size of the Stage between full and small. When the Stage is small, the Scripts Area is bigger, so you might find that ...

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