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Raspberry Pi For Dummies by Mike Cook, Sean McManus

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Adjusting the Settings on Your Raspberry Pi

The settings that your Raspberry Pi uses are stored in files on the SD card, and many of them are in a file called config.txt that’s in the /boot directory. You can edit this file directly to change your computer’s settings using a simple text editor called Nano that is pre-installed on your Raspberry Pi.

tip.eps You might not need to adjust the settings manually. Try running the Raspi-config program, which gives you a simple menu for changing some of the most frequently used options (see Chapter 3). You can run the program at any time using the following command in the shell:

sudo raspi-config

remember.eps The shell is covered in Chapter 5, but in brief it is the first prompt you see after logging in to your Raspberry Pi. You can also open it by double-clicking the LX Terminal icon in the desktop environment (see Chapter 5).

Raspi-config can make changes for you without you having to edit any configuration files, so it’s more convenient than editing config.txt yourself, and there is less risk of error too. If the option you need isn’t covered in the Raspi-config menu, you need to edit the configuration file manually.

warning_bomb.eps Before you start tampering with the config.txt ...

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