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Raspberry Pi For Dummies by Mike Cook, Sean McManus

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Drawing Sprites in Scratch

One of the most distinctive ways to put your fingerprint on your game is to draw your own sprites for it. Even if it plays the same as a well-known game, it’ll look unique if you hand-craft your images. Figure 11-2 shows the Paint Editor in Scratch.

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Scratch is developed by the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab. See http://scratch.mit.edu .

Figure 11-2: The Paint Editor in Scratch.

The checkered area on the right is the Canvas. The checkered pattern has a special meaning and is used to indicate parts of the image that are transparent, where the background will show through. Usually, you want everything outside the outline of your sprite to be transparent and everything inside it to be another color. Choose the color you want to use, or the checkered transparent “ink,” by using the Color Palette at the bottom-left of the Paint Editor (indicated in Figure 11-2).

Above the Color Palette, you can see your drawing and editing tools. Click one to select it, and you can then use it on the Canvas. The icon for your chosen tool is tinted blue so you can easily see which tool you are using. Underneath the tool icons is the Options area (indicated in Figure 11-2). This is where you can choose how to use a particular tool. The main tools are (from left to right, top row first):

Paintbrush: Hold down the mouse button as you move over the Canvas to ...

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