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Raspberry Pi For Dummies by Mike Cook, Sean McManus

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Deciding What Else You Need

The creators of Raspberry Pi have stripped costs to the bone to enable you to own a fully featured computer for about $25–$35, so you’ll need to scavenge or buy a few other bits and pieces. I say “scavenge” because the things you need are exactly the kind of things many people have lying around their house or garage already, or can easily pick up from friends or neighbors. In particular, if you’re using a Raspberry Pi as your second computer, you probably have most of the peripherals you need. That said, you might find they’re not fully compatible with the Raspberry Pi and you need to buy replacements to use with the Pi.

Here’s a checklist of what else you might need:

check.png Monitor: The Raspberry Pi has a high definition video feed and uses an HDMI (high definition multimedia interface) connection for it. If your monitor has an HDMI socket, you can connect the Raspberry Pi directly to it. If your monitor does not support HDMI, it probably has a DVI socket, and you can get a simple and cheap converter that enables you to connect an HDMI cable to it. Older VGA (video graphics array) monitors aren’t officially supported by the Raspberry Pi Foundation, but devices are available to convert the HDMI signal into a VGA one. If you’re thinking of buying a converter, check online to see whether it works with the Raspberry Pi first. A lot of cheap cables are just cables, ...

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