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Raspberry Pi For Dummies by Mike Cook, Sean McManus

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Jukebox

A wireless jukebox was the first project that Tarek Ziadé decided to undertake with his first Raspberry Pi. The idea is that people can add songs to the jukebox’s queue over the local network. It’s a relatively simple project that doesn’t require any electrical skills.

Tarek’s first steps were to add a USB stick to create more storage for the music library and to buy a USB battery to power the Raspberry Pi. All of the components he chose were small, so that the jukebox would be portable. Tarek used the default Debian image for the Raspberry Pi, and after some updates to the operating system, including enabling sound (which was at that time turned off by default), he was ready to start creating the jukebox.

His original plan had been to write his own jukebox program in Python, but Tarek then found an existing application called Jukebox that met all his requirements. Jukebox enables anyone to search for a song (by artist, title, album, year, or genre) in the music library on the USB storage device and then add it to a queue for playing.

Since completing his Raspberry Pi jukebox, Tarek has added a miniature speaker, created a Lego case, and made the Raspberry Pi jukebox truly portable: http://blog.ziade.org/2012/07/01/a-raspberry-pi-juke-box-how-to/ .

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