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Raspberry Pi For Dummies by Mike Cook, Sean McManus

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Connecting Audio

If you’re using a HDMI television, the sound is routed through the HDMI cable to the screen, so you don’t need to connect a separate audio cable.

Otherwise, the audio socket of your Raspberry Pi is a small black box stuck along the top edge of the board (see Figure 3-1). If you have earphones or headphones from a portable music player, you can plug them directly into this socket.

Alternatively, you can plug a suitable cable into this socket to feed the audio into a television, stereo, or PC speakers for a more impressive sound. Figure 3-5 shows such a cable with the Pi’s 3.5mm audio jack on the right of the picture, and the two stereo plugs that feed audio into many stereos shown on the right. The cable you need might be different, depending on the input sockets on your audio equipment.

If you’re using PC speakers, note that they need to have their own power supply.

9781118554234-fg0305.tif

Figure 3-5: A cable for connecting your Raspberry Pi to your stereo.

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