C
ONNECTING
P
HYSICAL
H
AR DWAR E
If you don’t have experience connecting audio equipment, your first glimpse
at a professional’s collection of cables can be daunting. Audio cables come
in a variety of shapes and sizes. Fortunately, these connectors, despite their
physical differences, do the same thing: they carry signals between equip-
ment. Here are some specific factors to pay attention to:
Physical connector types: Jacks and plugs are differently shaped con-
nections on your equipment. Generally speaking, a plug (the “male”
side of the connection) has protruding pins and is found at the end of a
cable, while the jack (the “female” side) is found on a panel and has one
or more recesses into which the plug’s protrusions fit. You’ll want to
match up the physical connectors so you’re not literally trying to fit a
square peg into a round hole. You won’t need to buy all new cables,
though. If a connection doesn’t fit, you may be able to buy an adapter.
Adapters won’t convert one type of signal to another, however.
Figure 3.3 Auralex MoPAD
monitor isolation pads. (Photo
courtesy Auralex Acoustics)
86
C
HAPTER
3: S
ETTING
U
P
Y
OUR
E
QUIPMENT

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