O'Reilly logo

Real World XML by Steven Holzner

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

XLinks

As of this writing, the XLink specification is a W3C recommendation, released on June 27, 2001. You can find the most current version of this recommendation at www.w3.org/TR/xlink. You use XLinks to link one document to another. Here's what the W3C says in the W3C working draft:

This specification defines the XML Linking Language (XLink), which allows elements to be inserted into XML documents in order to create and describe links between resources. It uses XML syntax to create structures that can describe links similar to the simple unidirectional hyperlinks of today's HTML, as well as more sophisticated links.

Here's an example to give you an idea of what an XLink looks like. Unlike HTML hyperlinks, any element can be a link in XML. ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required