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Recording and Producing Audio for Media by Stanley R. Alten

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Chapter 6. Recording

Until the advent of experimental digital audio recording in the 1960s and commercial digital recordings in the early 1970s, the format used was analog. In analog recording the waveform of the signal being processed resembles the waveform of the original sound—they are analogous. The frequency and the amplitude of an electrical signal changes continuously in direct relationship to the original acoustic sound waves; it is always “on.” If these continuous changes were examined, they would reveal an infinite number of variations, each instant different from any adjacent instant. During processing, noise—electrical, electronic, or tape—may be added to the signal. Hence the processed signal is analogous to the original sound plus ...

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